New Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) resource tackles online misogyny

Published 07/02/2024.  Last updated 07/02/2024

Education Scotland has published its latest resource as part of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) peer mentoring programme.

The ‘Challenging Online Misogyny’ resource aims to tackle online misogyny and abuse and can be used by existing MVP schools.

The two-part lesson will be delivered by MVP mentors and will offer a safe space to discuss gender-related pressures among young people, the scale of online misogyny, the impact that it has on pupils and skills, and strategies to recognise and challenge discriminatory behaviours.

Shaped by the MVP team at Education Scotland in collaboration with Dr Kaitlyn Regehr from the University College London, the resource can be used to support activities including professional learning and dialogue among peers.

Underpinned by existing research, the lesson provides guidance, learning materials and scenario examples focused on what online misogyny looks like, how it impacts individuals and society, and why it requires challenge.

Gillian Hamilton, Chief Executive of Education Scotland said: “The rapid and vast adoption of social media means there is now a space where people can make anonymous threats against others and share misogynistic views amongst a wide audience. Addressing and tackling this type of violence and abuse requires education,transparency and coordinated action.

"The Challenging Online Misogyny resource, which is part of the Mentors in Violence Prevention programme, has been developed to give pupils guidance on how to speak to their peers to empower them to challenge their thinking and speak up on gender-based violence.

“The two-part lesson will explore and challenge the attitudes, beliefs and cultural norms that underpin various forms of online misogyny in our society, particularly among school-aged boys.

“I hope schools across Scotland find the resource effective and I encourage them to share feedback with their programme leaders at Education Scotland.”

Victims and Community Safety Minister Siobhian Brown said: “The Mentors in Violence Prevention programme is now delivered in over half of Scotland’s schools and is a key part of our Violence Prevention Framework and aims to prevent and reduce violence against women and girls.

“I welcome the launch of the resource and the extra support to tackle online misogyny and abuse. This suite of lessons and supporting guidance will give young people the opportunity to safely explore what online misogyny looks like, the potential harms it can cause and to develop vital digital skills to keep themselves and others safe.

“This resource, as with all Mentors in Violence Prevention resources, aims to equip learners with the skills and confidence to support their friends and their school community in developing safe and healthy relationships.”

More than 190 schools in Scotland are now part of the MVP programme. MVP schools can find the new ‘Challenging Online Misogyny’ resource on the MVP website. For schools that would like more information regarding the MVP programme and access to all of its resources, contact the MVP team.

New Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) resource tackles online misogyny

Published 07/02/2024.  Last updated 07/02/2024

Education Scotland has published its latest resource as part of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) peer mentoring programme.

The ‘Challenging Online Misogyny’ resource aims to tackle online misogyny and abuse and can be used by existing MVP schools.

The two-part lesson will be delivered by MVP mentors and will offer a safe space to discuss gender-related pressures among young people, the scale of online misogyny, the impact that it has on pupils and skills, and strategies to recognise and challenge discriminatory behaviours.

Shaped by the MVP team at Education Scotland in collaboration with Dr Kaitlyn Regehr from the University College London, the resource can be used to support activities including professional learning and dialogue among peers.

Underpinned by existing research, the lesson provides guidance, learning materials and scenario examples focused on what online misogyny looks like, how it impacts individuals and society, and why it requires challenge.

Gillian Hamilton, Chief Executive of Education Scotland said: “The rapid and vast adoption of social media means there is now a space where people can make anonymous threats against others and share misogynistic views amongst a wide audience. Addressing and tackling this type of violence and abuse requires education,transparency and coordinated action.

"The Challenging Online Misogyny resource, which is part of the Mentors in Violence Prevention programme, has been developed to give pupils guidance on how to speak to their peers to empower them to challenge their thinking and speak up on gender-based violence.

“The two-part lesson will explore and challenge the attitudes, beliefs and cultural norms that underpin various forms of online misogyny in our society, particularly among school-aged boys.

“I hope schools across Scotland find the resource effective and I encourage them to share feedback with their programme leaders at Education Scotland.”

Victims and Community Safety Minister Siobhian Brown said: “The Mentors in Violence Prevention programme is now delivered in over half of Scotland’s schools and is a key part of our Violence Prevention Framework and aims to prevent and reduce violence against women and girls.

“I welcome the launch of the resource and the extra support to tackle online misogyny and abuse. This suite of lessons and supporting guidance will give young people the opportunity to safely explore what online misogyny looks like, the potential harms it can cause and to develop vital digital skills to keep themselves and others safe.

“This resource, as with all Mentors in Violence Prevention resources, aims to equip learners with the skills and confidence to support their friends and their school community in developing safe and healthy relationships.”

More than 190 schools in Scotland are now part of the MVP programme. MVP schools can find the new ‘Challenging Online Misogyny’ resource on the MVP website. For schools that would like more information regarding the MVP programme and access to all of its resources, contact the MVP team.